galleryyuhself.tumblr.com

Gallery Yuhself is the logical space for a continued site on Graphic Design (see:galleryyuhself.blogspot.com) in Trinidad and Tobago, the Caribean and the World.
I would like to see this site become a resource over time and in so doing, feel free to add images and comments to assist in this loose information gathering exercise.

August 19, 2014 6:54 pm 5:21 pm
theafrocentricasian:

World’s languages traced back to single African mother tongue: scientists.
New Zealand researchers have traced every human language — from English to Mandarin — back to an ancestral language spoken in Africa 50,000 to 70,000 years ago.
Scientists say they have traced the world’s 6,000 modern languages — from English to Mandarin — back to a single “mother tongue,” an ancestral language spoken in Africa 50,000 to 70,000 years ago.
New research, published in the journal Science, suggests this single ancient language resulted in human civilization — a Diaspora — as well as advances in art and hunting tool technology, and laid the groundwork for all the world’s cultures.
The research, by Quentin Atkinson from the University of Auckland in New Zealand, also found that speech evolved far earlier than previously thought. And the findings implied, though did not prove, that modern language originated only once, an issue of controversy among linguists, according to the New York Times.
Before Atkinson came up with the evidence for a single African origin of language, some scientists had argued that language evolved independently in different parts of the world.
Atkinson found that the first populations migrating from Africa laid the groundwork for all the world’s cultures by taking their single language with them. “It was the catalyst that spurred the human expansion that we all are a product of,” Atkinson said, the Wall Street Journal reported.
Atkinson traced the number distinct sounds, or phonemes — consonants, vowels and tones — in 504 world languages, finding compelling evidence that they can be traced back to a long-forgotten dialect spoken by our Stone Age ancestors, according to the Daily Mail.
Atkinson also hypothesized that languages with the most sounds would be the oldest, while those spoken by smaller breakaway groups would utilize fewer sounds as variation and complexity diminished.
The study found that some of the click-using languages of Africa have more than 100 phonemes, or sounds, whereas Hawaiian, toward the far end of the human migration route out of Africa, has only 13, the Times reported. English has about 45 phonemes.
The phoneme pattern mirrors the pattern of human genetic diversity as humans spread across the globe from sub-Saharan Africa around 70,000 years ago.
Source: http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/business-tech/science/110415/language-science-linguistics-mother-tongue-english-chinese-mandarin-africa

theafrocentricasian:

World’s languages traced back to single African mother tongue: scientists.

New Zealand researchers have traced every human language — from English to Mandarin — back to an ancestral language spoken in Africa 50,000 to 70,000 years ago.

Scientists say they have traced the world’s 6,000 modern languages — from English to Mandarin — back to a single “mother tongue,” an ancestral language spoken in Africa 50,000 to 70,000 years ago.

New research, published in the journal Science, suggests this single ancient language resulted in human civilization — a Diaspora — as well as advances in art and hunting tool technology, and laid the groundwork for all the world’s cultures.

The research, by Quentin Atkinson from the University of Auckland in New Zealand, also found that speech evolved far earlier than previously thought. And the findings implied, though did not prove, that modern language originated only once, an issue of controversy among linguists, according to the New York Times.

Before Atkinson came up with the evidence for a single African origin of language, some scientists had argued that language evolved independently in different parts of the world.

Atkinson found that the first populations migrating from Africa laid the groundwork for all the world’s cultures by taking their single language with them. “It was the catalyst that spurred the human expansion that we all are a product of,” Atkinson said, the Wall Street Journal reported.

Atkinson traced the number distinct sounds, or phonemes — consonants, vowels and tones — in 504 world languages, finding compelling evidence that they can be traced back to a long-forgotten dialect spoken by our Stone Age ancestors, according to the Daily Mail.

Atkinson also hypothesized that languages with the most sounds would be the oldest, while those spoken by smaller breakaway groups would utilize fewer sounds as variation and complexity diminished.

The study found that some of the click-using languages of Africa have more than 100 phonemes, or sounds, whereas Hawaiian, toward the far end of the human migration route out of Africa, has only 13, the Times reported. English has about 45 phonemes.

The phoneme pattern mirrors the pattern of human genetic diversity as humans spread across the globe from sub-Saharan Africa around 70,000 years ago.

Source: http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/business-tech/science/110415/language-science-linguistics-mother-tongue-english-chinese-mandarin-africa

(via sheilastansbury)

11:08 am
cartermagazine:

Today In History We Honor Sir Viv Richards
"Sir Viv Richards is the man who gave "swagger" new meaning in cricket, Richards was the most destructive batsman of his era, and while there are many with greater records, few could take on, intimidate, and rip to shreds bowling attacks like he did." via Mike Selvey/espncricinfo
(photo: Sir Viv Richards)
- CARTER Magazine

cartermagazine:

Today In History We Honor Sir Viv Richards

"Sir Viv Richards is the man who gave "swagger" new meaning in cricket, Richards was the most destructive batsman of his era, and while there are many with greater records, few could take on, intimidate, and rip to shreds bowling attacks like he did." via Mike Selvey/espncricinfo

(photo: Sir Viv Richards)

- CARTER Magazine

(via sheilastansbury)

11:06 am February 1, 2014 9:24 am

thisiswhitehistory:

Day 12 of White History Month: The Imposition of Colorism and Colonial Beauty Standards on People of Color

This is a long post adapted from a longer essay which references a lot of studies so you might notice there’s no works cited, but if you really want it, send me an ask.

Related to racism and colonialism, colorism is the discrimination against darker skin and preference for lighter skin among people of color. Colorism was created by European colonial standards. It was engineered by white people and white people continue to harm people of color with colorism in the media, workplace, and in their own minds.

White people tend to be unaware of the nature of colorism because of the popularity of tanning. Within mainstream white American culture, tanning has become a trend, leading many white people to be ignorant of how prized fair skin is. A preference for tanned (white) skin among white people does not negate colorism. Tanned skin is a trend and is also tied to class and status (time for leisure) while in the past, tanned skin was linked to working outdoors. When white people are aware of colorism, they often try to portray it as a tragic phenomenon among people of color and not one that is the result of whiteness, racism, and colonialism.

Many people of color are also unaware of the true nature of colorism, as well; some believe it to simply be a harmless “feud” between lighter and darker skinned people of color. This is not the case. While many light-skinned and white passing people of color may feel a disconnect from their racial identity due to their skin color, this does not negate the privilege they have. Colorism is directly related to  colonialism, showing tangible effects on people of color. Communities of color are divided by skin color and given privilege based on their proximity to whiteness.

Historically

Racist colonial logic emerging from slavery associated Blackness with savagery and ugliness, as opposed to whiteness which was associated with civilization and beauty. From this logic emerged features associated with whiteness – light eyes, straight/long hair, narrow nose, and thin lips – being considered good, while features associated with Blackness – dark eyes, kinky/short hair, wider nose, and full lips – being considered bad. 

Historically, during slavery, light-skinned Black people were treated less violently by overseers, were more likely to be given household duties instead of more difficult work, had better living conditions, and had more possibilities for education and eventual manumission (Rockquemore and Brunsma). After slavery, lighter-skinned Black people had more opportunities for prestige and success. 

Hypodescent - the “one-drop” rule - meant that anyone with Black ancestry would be considered Black, no matter what their appearance was. Light-skinned Black people were encouraged to think highly of themselves and were literally “valued” at higher prices during slavery. Those classified as “Mulatto” were more likely to be freed; mixed Black people (classified using the antiquated term “mulatto”) made up 10-15% of the total Black population, but 37% of all free Black people. 

Freed Black people during slavery and those were well established after slavery tended to be light-skinned. Paper bag tests were used in Black communities to establish admission to social events, fraternities/sororities, and more, shutting out darker-skinned Black Americans from networking opportunities. Noting that lighter skinned Black people were more likely to successful, sociologist E.B. Reuter (1918) noted that even some “white blood” would “improve” Black people (rather than the obvious fact that lighter skinned Black people were treated better).

White colonizers created caste systems and categorizations deriving from this racist logic, and from it emerged the categories of quadroons, Mestizos, and Mullatoes. In the Southwest United States, Mexicans were more likely to receive United States citizenship if they had lighter skin or passed for white. Colonizers in Africa, the Americas, and Asia treated lighter skinned people with more “European” features better than those with medium or dark skin and indigenous features.

People often try to absolve white people of responsibility for colorism that existed in Asian societies before European colonial contact, but it was not racially-based. The concept of race itself is a European and Western construction. Lighter skin was a class marker just as in European societies - darker skin was linked to laboring in the sun rather than proximity to whiteness. Even when lighter skin color was preferred, indigenous hair and eye color and facial features were previously the standard of beauty.

Effects Today (behind the cut)

Read More

(via sheilastansbury)

9:22 am
Inscreva seu filme para ANIMA MUNDI 2014 / Submissions for Anima Mundi 2014 now open!

latinocaribbeanartists:

Prezados animadores,

ESTÃO ABERTAS ATÉ DIA 17 DE MARÇO AS INSCRIÇÕES PARA O ANIMA MUNDI 2014!

Inscrevam suas novas produções em www.animamundi.com.br!
É só se cadastrar ou fazer login em nossa área pessoal para ter acesso à ficha de inscrição on-line e à etiqueta de…

(via sexypinkon)

9:17 am

designcloud:

Graphic: Inside the Sketchbooks of the World’s Great Graphic Designers by Steven Heller.

We are constantly surrounded by design—in advertisements, in books and magazines, on the Internet, on television—and each graphic element we see was carefully constructed through a designer’s very personal process. Yet only the finished article is presented. Rarely do we gain insight into how visual solutions have been reached or the exploration, experimentation, and ideas behind them. In this ambitious publication, some one hundred of the world’s leading graphic designers and illustrators open up their private sketchbooks to offer a privileged glimpse into their creative processes. The result is a visual tour de force.

Among the many artists featured are Milton Glaser, an icon of American graphic design and creator of the seminal I Love New York logo, who was the first designer to receive the National Medal of Arts, in 2009. Michael Bierut, a partner of Pentagram Design, is known as an advocate of the power and influence of design and co-founded the online journal Design Observer; he has clients ranging from the Walt Disney Company to Princeton and Yale to the New York Jets. Ed Fella, a prolific photographer as well as an iconoclastic typographer and designer, is known for fusing high- and low-culture sources and began mixing, changing, and matching fonts long before it was possible—and popular—with desktop publishing. Bruce Mau is the designer of the seminal S,M,L,XL and now has a client list including MTV, Coca Cola, and Frank Gehry.

Ge it here: http://amzn.to/1iQr6oo

(Source: trendgraphy)

January 5, 2014 9:36 am

One of the leading technology suppliers in Trinidad & Tobago and the Eastern Caribbean.

9:26 am
Digicel Foundation is a non-profit organization that distributes and utilizes funds on a charitable basis for the sole purpose of building communities and community spirit in Jamaica.

Our Vision

The Digicel Foundation strives to ensure that communities are healthy, primarily through the support of Community based and driven activities which should embrace social, cultural and particularly educational objectives.

The Digicel Foundation was created to work with Government and Non – Governmental organizations which strive to support projects in Jamaica that cater to educational, social and cultural opportunities that will inspire and build positive energy in its citizens, which will in turn lead to stronger, self sufficient communities.
Founded in 2004 with a generous donation of J$60 million, the Digicel Foundation was created from the vision of our Patron, Denis O’ Brien, Chairman and Founder of Digicel.Over 200 projects have been undertaken since its inception benefiting thousands of Jamaican people and communities. When Hurricane Ivan struck in 2004, an additional J$200 million was donated to rebuild and provide support efforts to its many victims.
The unique character of the Digicel Foundation is that its Board is almost entirely comprised of Digicel Staff Members.
Digicel employees along with the Foundation assist communities through their time, expertise and leadership

Digicel Foundation is a non-profit organization that distributes and utilizes funds on a charitable basis for the sole purpose of building communities and community spirit in Jamaica.

Our Vision

The Digicel Foundation strives to ensure that communities are healthy, primarily through the support of Community based and driven activities which should embrace social, cultural and particularly educational objectives.

The Digicel Foundation was created to work with Government and Non – Governmental organizations which strive to support projects in Jamaica that cater to educational, social and cultural opportunities that will inspire and build positive energy in its citizens, which will in turn lead to stronger, self sufficient communities.
Founded in 2004 with a generous donation of J$60 million, the Digicel Foundation was created from the vision of our Patron, Denis O’ Brien, Chairman and Founder of Digicel.Over 200 projects have been undertaken since its inception benefiting thousands of Jamaican people and communities. When Hurricane Ivan struck in 2004, an additional J$200 million was donated to rebuild and provide support efforts to its many victims.
The unique character of the Digicel Foundation is that its Board is almost entirely comprised of Digicel Staff Members.
Digicel employees along with the Foundation assist communities through their time, expertise and leadership

9:23 am